Child Guidance, Teaching Children, Survival Skills for Kids, Preparedness

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Child Guidance, Teaching Children, Survival Skills for Kids, Preparedness

Child Guidance, Teaching Children, Survival Skills for Kids, Preparedness

Last Time, I wrote all about some of the needs of children of preppers, but today, I need to cover some consideration for training them.  This is in response to an email that I got from one of the wonderful community members that I have only found in this niche: Survival. Like I said last time, we need to learn the art and lovingly learn child guidance.  I want to show you how rewarding and fun teaching children can be.  There’s lots you can do for developing survival skills and preparedness in you kids.  Let’s get started:

It is a well-known fact by homeschooling parents and teachers (but unsurprisingly this escapes the government) that children love to learn by way of games.  This is the first thing to consider.  Make everything a game.

  • Learning GPS, Maps, Compass, and Orienteering: There is a great game for this.  It is called Geocaching.
    Child Guidance, Teaching Children, Survival Skills for Kids, Preparedness

    Child Guidance, Teaching Children, Survival Skills for Kids, Preparedness

    My kids love geocaching.  I show them how to use the GPS on my phone first, since it is incredibly easy to use, and next I let them cache with my GPS… Also hide a cache with it using the coordinate averaging function.

    • I then show them how to orient a map of an area using a compass.  Use smaller areas first.  This works well if you can place a Latitude, Longitude grid on a map and show them how to read those coordinates.
    • All of this from a high tech treasure hunt!  Just be sure to just teach one thing at a time.  They will learn better if you don’t overwhelm them.
  • Game #2 is “What can you fit in your Backpack?”  Below is a video of the very first time that we played this game.  Beside it is a link that has more of a description of what was done.  Generally speaking, you don’t give them parameters they have to follow.
    • I simply tell them to pretend that we will be gone for 3 days, and they need to fit everything they think that they NEED in their bag.  It is hilarious what they pack up in their bags for necessities.  It is also surprising some of the things that they pack, and you then realize that they have some little gears turning in that brain at times.
    • Obviously, you go over the stuff and why it may be good or bad.  Do this every month or so.
  • Game #3 is “Shoot the Can.”
    Child Guidance, Teaching Children, Survival Skills for Kids, Preparedness

    Child Guidance, Teaching Children, Survival Skills for Kids, Preparedness

    It depends on your location, the children’s age, etc.  Fill up old soda cans or bottles with expanding foam, like “Great Stuff” so the cans will last longer.  Let them shoot them up with their BB guns, Airsoft Guns, Pellet Rifles, .22s, etc.

    • These are great reactive targets that are way more fun than targets on paper.  With children, reactive targets are the way to go.  Another great reactive target as children get a little older, is balloons.  They pop when hit, and they move around with the wind, so you have an unpredictable, moving target!
  • Game #4 is simply a campout (maybe with a small hike to something fun… a prize).  Dad should learn a valuable skill ahead of time and practice it so he doesn’t look too much like an idiot.  For instance, it takes a LONG time to build a fire guys.  I remember that I failed my first time using flint and magnesium, but now I can usually get a decent fire going in 15 minutes or less.  This is with a cheaters tool, so think about how much worse it would be with a hand-drill method.
    • In this scenario, Dad needs to have lighters and other cheater tinder, like cotton balls and Vaseline.  Why?  This shows that Dad was prepared with a contingency plan.  You also allow the children to attempt the fire starting at an age you are comfortable at.

Enough on the games, you can think about what your normal desired skills are, and come up with a game that is similar to the skill.  GAMES PEOPLE!  Make it fun, and keep expectations low.

Children’s Helpful Prepping Items

Not everything that a child has is crap for prepping.  Much of the items that they use as toys, can be used for assistance during an emergency situation.  It really comes up to your imagination.  Here’s another bonus game: Grab a stack of toys, and ask the children how they are useful in survival.  Below are some common items and uses.

  • Sling Shot – Small Game
  • Bicycle – Transport for people or things
  • Wagon – Transport mostly for things, like a wheel barrow would be, but can move small people also.
  • Walkie Talkies – Duh, to talk.  They are also useful between cars in a convoy.
  • Sandbox – Using the Sand to fill sandbags to place at gates and doors.
  • Scooter – Don’t throw this out.  If you are stuck on the road and have to walk a ways, the foldable razor scooter could help you get there faster on the downhill.
  • Crayons – are made of wax! The crayon paper acts like a wick.  Lasts for 20 minutes or so.

One last thing: Take a break from teaching them occasionally.  Everyone needs a break.  Everything that you teach your children will be extremely fun for you as well if you turn it into a game.  The kiddos get valuable “dad time” and are learning skills at the same time!

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Ken
Ken
Ken is addicted to fitness and mountain biking. He is such a thrill seeker, people are starting to be concerned!He enjoys MTBing, Hiking, Climbing, Geocaching, Orienteering, Weight Lifting, and Wilderness Survival.

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