How to Build a Snare Trap 8: Ojibwa- How to catch a Bird

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How to Build a Snare Trap 8: Ojibwa- How to catch a Bird

How to Build a Snare Trap 8: Ojibwa- How to catch a Bird

 

 

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Well, I never though this series would get to eight posts!  But, it has.  In this post, which is part of a series called, “How to Build a Snare Trap,” I will be teaching you about how to catch a bird in a survival situation using an Ojibwa Snare. 

I need to say that I have never actually made this snare, but the knowledge of it is here.  If you want, I would welcome any improvements in the design to be placed in the comments.  I was considering a method of using a sideways dowel under tension (so you don’t need a hole) that drops when the perch is landed on, but for the purpose of the post, I feel it best to give the well known method for building it instead of my creative alterations to a proven method.

So, shall we get to it?  Here is how to design an Ojibwa Snare:

How to Build a Snare Trap 8: Ojibwa- How to catch a Bird

How to Build a Snare Trap 8: Ojibwa- How to catch a Bird

1. Find a flexible green sapling.
2. Drill a hole in the sapling and groove a notch at the bait side
3. Tie your line to a springy branch, or if you found a small enough tree, the top of the tree.
4. Pull line with tension through the hole, I would thread hole and THEN, tie it to the limb or top, then pull tension.  More than needed.
5. Wrap around main trunk so you can actually tie the needed knots, and then you will unwrap from trunk.
6. Insert Perch into groove with knot holding it in place, using the tension to wedge both of them in place.
7. Place snare around entire perch, and bait the perch.

When a bird lands on the perch to eat the bait, the perch that is only held by the knot will fall, allowing the knot and line to slip through hole.  The snare will then tighten around the legs of the bird with tension on it.

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Ken
Ken
Ken is addicted to fitness and mountain biking. He is such a thrill seeker, people are starting to be concerned!He enjoys MTBing, Hiking, Climbing, Geocaching, Orienteering, Weight Lifting, and Wilderness Survival.

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