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How to Build a Snare Trap P2: Pole & Rock Spring Snare Step 1

How to Build a Snare Trap P2: Pole & Rock Spring Snare Step 1

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I want to continue on what I did yesterday.  Yesterday, I showed you how to build a simple snare trap.  Today I will get a little more complex, and show you how to build one called a spring snare.  From the name, you can tell that I will be making somewhat of a trigger that will enable a spring tension to be placed on your game.  The tension for this one will be created with either a sapling or from a rock weight.

This one is much more reliable than the simple snare, because once the animal gets caught, the snare doesn’t loosen, making it harder to escape.  Let’s get started.

 

How to Build a Snare Trap P2: Pole & Rock Spring Snare Step 1

How to Build a Snare Trap P2: Pole & Rock Spring Snare Step 1

 

Step 1a: Find a sapling (small young flexible tree) that you can bend almost to the ground without breaking.  You will want this to be next to your game trail, the trail that you have lots of evidence of game actually traveling through there often.

Step 1b: An alternative to the sapling will be to find a mature tree with large enough branch to hang a rock on.  You will want a good 5-10 lb rock tied to a rope.  Wrap the rope over the branch and hanging down the other side.  Both of these methods are good ways to create tension.  The unloaded side of the rope/twine/etc. will be the end you build your snare with.

 

How to Build a Snare Trap P2: Pole & Rock Spring Snare Step 2 thru 10

How to Build a Snare Trap P2: Pole & Rock Spring Snare Step 2 thru 10

Step 2: You want to aquire two sticks about the same size that are shaped like 7’s, but with the top of it pointing down slightly, or even like an upside down Y.  Sharpen the long end of the 7, so it is easier to hammer it into the ground.

Step 3: Procure a straight narrow stick about a foot or two in length, place on the ground to measure the distance between the ‘7’ pieces.  You hammer them slightly closer together than the length of the straight stick so they can hold it under them as part of the trigger mechanism.

Step 4: You will want a third thicker stick at least as tall as the ‘7’s and hammer it into the ground to form a triangle.  The 7’s on one side of the game trail, and the post stick on the other side of the trail.

Step 5: Now comes the part that is difficult to describe in text, but I will try (fortunately, I know how to paint and photoshop to make some photos!)  Find another stick, and preferably one that you can flatten a little on one side, but not necessary.  This is a small stick about 2 inches in length.  Tie the rope from steps 1 to the center of this stick.

Step 6: Find another stick that will reach from the post stick across to the middle of the imaginary line that connects the two ‘7’ posts.

Step 7: You put the small stick from step 5, under the stick from step 3, so that it is being held on just one side on stick 3 and the other side on stick from step 6.

Step 8: With the remaining rope or line, you will place a snare loop under the stick from step 6 and hold it to the ground in a wide fashion with some very small stick that will easily give and provide very little resistance to spring tension.

Step 9: Now you bait inside the loop and a small amount on the center of the stick above it.

Step 10: Additionally I recommend building a funnel, of sorts, that will almost ensure that your prey will take the path of least resistance straight into your snare.

The animal will hopefully take the bait and hit the trip stick (the one from step 6) which will then release the trigger stick (step 5) which will allow the spring or weight to pull on the loop and provide tension against the snare.  One around the animal, it is very hard to get out of this one, so it is much better than the simple snare from yesterday.

You want to practice and perfect this prior to needing it because it is important that you know how to build it reliably with a nice “hair trigger” to raise your chance of success.

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Ken
Ken
Ken is addicted to fitness and mountain biking. He is such a thrill seeker, people are starting to be concerned!He enjoys MTBing, Hiking, Climbing, Geocaching, Orienteering, Weight Lifting, and Wilderness Survival.

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