NOAA Weather Service & How to be a Storm Chaser or Spotter

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NOAA Weather Service & How to be a Storm Chaser or Spotter

NOAA Weather Service & How to be a Storm Chaser or Spotter from Jumbled Obsessions

 

NOAA Weather Service & How to be a Storm Chaser or Spotter

NOAA Weather Service & How to be a Storm Chaser or Spotter from Jumbled Obsessions

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Part of modern survival is being regionally prepared for the probable.  Instead of worrying about what will happen, we can learn more about it, eradicate fear, and maybe be prepared more than we thought we could be.  I am talking about storms and tornados.  By eradicate fear, I don’t mean be stupid by ignoring the danger.  I mean that with knowledge, your fear will dwindle some because you will have a better understanding of how to respond.

The best way to learn about severe weather and tornados is probably by taking the FREE NOAA Weather Service sanctioned class about how to be a Storm Spotter or Storm Chaser.

The NOAA, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, National Weather Service has classes throughout the country.  These classes are organized by local weather services, so there is usually one scheduled near many people.  The classes are in an effort to train more personnel in storm formation to get “more eyes on the ground” and to raise the information flowing into the center in the event of severe weather coming from credible sources.

I can go out buying supplies to hide from a tornado and for $5,000 I can have a nice storm shelter, but I can learn about them and how to spot them for FREE.  If you aren’t willing to get free information that will only take a few hours of your time, you aren’t really a prepper.

Your benefit is knowing storm structure, tornado structure, when it is likely that these will form, the likely path of travel, and how to see them on radars (All of which are good ways of getting OUT of the way of a storm).  You can also become a safety conscious person actually involved with doing good for others.  Not so selfish anymore, huh?

This NWS (National Weather Service) program is called SKYWARN.  If you follow the link, you can take the Basic, Advanced, and Chaser Modules that have all of the information BUT IS NOT the certified training.  I would highly recommend this information to any of you.

If you go to the Skywarn Website, then they have instructions on how to find training.  The information on the site:

Classes are free and typically are about two hours long. To find a class in your area:

  • Go to: http://www.stormready.noaa.gov/contact.htm and click on your state
  • When your state comes up, click on the name of your Weather Forecast Office  (My Addition: These are regional offices, not county)
  • Once at your local WFO home page, in the blue bar on the left, look for the SKYWARN link to find a schedule of classes and other local information (My Addition: In the left menu bar about three quarters of the way down, it is a text link, so don’t look for a big fancy logo)
  • Spotter’s Guide: English, Espanol

Once you get to the local NWS website, it is kind of up to you to find more information on it, but I think I have gotten you pretty close, without adding 50 different websites to my post.

I do have to give an honorable mention to the Norman, OK NWS since they give links DIRECTLY to some online information by detailed photos and powerpoint slides with audio.   AWESOME!

I have taken the basic spotter, and the advanced spotter class twice.  I haven’t yet but plan on taking the chaser class.  Not to become a chaser, but I really like knowing about the storms.

Other Really Good Online Training Information:

http://www.crh.noaa.gov/dmx/presentations/spotter-training/NWS-Spotter-Training_files/frame.htm

http://www.nws.noaa.gov/training/wxspot.php

And just a thought, but while you are at it, becoming an amateur radio person is worthwhile as well.  You will no longer be limited by channels or power.

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Ken
Ken
Ken is addicted to fitness and mountain biking. He is such a thrill seeker, people are starting to be concerned!He enjoys MTBing, Hiking, Climbing, Geocaching, Orienteering, Weight Lifting, and Wilderness Survival.

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