How to Build a Snare Trap P3: Penny or Washer Snare Lock

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How to Build a Snare Trap P3: Penny or Washer Snare Lock Steps 1 thru 3 for Self Locking Snare

How to Build a Snare Trap P3: Penny or Washer Snare Lock Steps 1 thru 3 for Self Locking Snare

 

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Seems like I am on a roll with showing you how to build a snare trap huh?  I have shown a simple snare and a way to make a spring snare.  Today is not so much a focus on the snaring, but more on the mechanism for locking.

The loop I am going to show you today is not a wilderness emergency available item.  You have to be proactive in the building of this snare loop and place it in your bag.

The design for the loop is extremely simple, but it really works.  It uses either a copper penny or a washer snare lock.  You have to use a pre-1985 copper penny, because the newer ones are junk and will break when bent.

What you will need:

  1. A 1/16 in. diameter stainless steel cable
  2. A 1/16 in. copper end stop
  3. A 1/16 in. oval compression sleeve
  4. A copper penny or 1/2 in. washer
  5. You will need a vice, or crimping tool (crimper, hammer, etc) for the endstop, oval sleeve, and to bend the penny.
  6. Drill bit just big enough to drill a hole that the cable can fit into, about 3/32 or 2/16 bit.
  7. Cable cutters to cut cable to desired length
How to Build a Snare Trap P3: Penny or Washer Snare Lock Require Tools for Self Locking Snare

How to Build a Snare Trap P3: Penny or Washer Snare Lock Require Tools for Self Locking Snare

How to Build a Snare Trap P3: Penny or Washer Snare Lock Steps 1 thru 3 for Self Locking Snare

How to Build a Snare Trap P3: Penny or Washer Snare Lock Steps 1 thru 3 for Self Locking Snare

First, get your penny and drill holes 180 degrees from each other.  That is, if you drew a line down the center of the penny face, place the drilled holes on both ends of the line.

Now draw another line on the penny perpendicular to the first one to make a cross or X on the penny.  This is your bend line.

Bend the Penny at a 90 degree angle (or a square angle) along the bend line.

Now place the copper endstop on the end of the cable and crimp it down.

Cut the cable to the length that you want.  I recommend a couple feet at least.  You can always cut it down more, if you think it is too long.

Feed the un-stopped end of the cable through one hole of the penny and pull the penny all the way down to the stop.

Next, feed the cable through the other hole, making a large loop between the holes of the penny.  This is your actual snare loop.

Now on the un-stopped end you will make a loop to attach the trigger or mechanism to.  You will make this by passing the cable tthrough the oval fitting, make a loop, and pass the cable back the other direction through the oval fitting, and then crimp it down.  I recommend making the loop big enough to place 2-3 fingers into, so you can pass larger objects, or the snare loop through it.

How to Build a Snare Trap P3: Penny or Washer Snare Lock Self Locking Snare

How to Build a Snare Trap P3: Penny or Washer Snare Lock Self Locking Snare

 

You are done with your self-locking snare.  The penny will allow the cable to pull and slip in one direction, but it will bite down in the other direction not allowing movement of the cable.  If made properly, it can only get tighter, although you can loosen it back up by adjusting the penny to allow slip again.

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Ken
Ken
Ken is addicted to fitness and mountain biking. He is such a thrill seeker, people are starting to be concerned!He enjoys MTBing, Hiking, Climbing, Geocaching, Orienteering, Weight Lifting, and Wilderness Survival.

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